Ward 3 Mark D’Agostino, Gerson Monteiro

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BROCKTON – The following is a corporate questionnaire completed by Ward 3 councilor and school committee candidates running in the November 2 municipal elections. Answers have been edited for length.

Mark D’Agostino will face Gerson Monteiro for the seat of Ward 3 councilor in next Tuesday’s election. D’Agostino, who is currently a member of the Ward 3 school committee, became the frontrunner after the September primary elections. The incumbent Dennis Eaniri is not running for re-election.

Candidates Jared Homer and Alan Green are vying for the seat of the Ward 3 D’Agostino School Committee is vacant. Homer became the front-runner for the seat after the September primary elections.

Ward Councilor 3

Marc D’Agostino

Age: 43

Biography : D’Agostino is the owner of D’Agostino Insurance, attended Framingham State University and is an independent politician. He was a member of the Brockton school committee for three terms and was vice-chair of the school committee for two terms.

1. What do you think is the biggest problem facing Brockton and / or your ward right now?

When talking to voters, the most common concern is public safety, including traffic. Therefore, public safety will be a top priority for me as an advisor.

2. If elected, what would you do to revitalize Brockton?

Improvements in infrastructure, more efficient authorization and approval process, and strengthening of code enforcement and cleaning of city properties.

3. If elected, what would you do to make sure housing is affordable in Brockton?

Prices in the current real estate market are at an all time high. While we can’t necessarily control market fluctuations, what we can do is encourage developers to offer more homes at market price to increase the number of homes in the city.

This increased supply will help reduce the cost of houses and apartments. In addition, if we continue to expand our commercial tax base, this may provide some tax relief for residential taxpayers.

Gerson Monteiro

Age: 41

Biography : Gerson Monteiro was born on the island of São Vicente, one of the 10 islands that make up Cabo Verde. When he was 10 years old, his family decided to emigrate to the United States. They lived in Pawtucket, Rhode Island for just over a year before moving to Brockton.

Monteiro is a product of Brockton Public Schools and is a Class of 98 graduate from Brockton High School. He worked as an educator for 12 years in Brockton Public Schools at the middle and high school level and currently teaches history.

Monteiro is also a board member of the Southeast Regional Technical High School, representative of SEIU, board member of Our Children, Our Future and Registered Democrat.

1. What do you think is the biggest problem facing Brockton and / or your ward right now?

Brockton and Ward 3 face many issues and all of them are equally important to me. But I think some of the top issues, in no particular order, are affordable housing, taxes, and infrastructure.

2. If elected, what would you do to revitalize Brockton?

Our city has the potential to become a cultural and commercial center for Plymouth County. A sustainable economic development strategy would benefit the public by creating jobs that support families, equal opportunities and a more equitable distribution of wealth, while protecting the rights of workers.

We would adopt a plan for economic development in Brockton that would be revised annually as part of a public process, which would influence city policies and practices, including budget and planning decisions, and which would focus on neighborhoods that require the most investment.

This plan would encourage local small businesses and start-ups by providing services such as entrepreneurial training, microcredit, assistance with business plans, and assistance in locating available offices and manufacturing sites.

We will also implement municipal policies that promote accessible transit options in all areas of the city to ensure economic development along transit corridors, making jobs and business activities accessible without dependency. of a car.

3. If elected, what would you do to make sure housing is affordable in Brockton?

We would ensure that the Town of Brockton provides high quality, safe, equitable, accessible and affordable housing for all residents.

This would be accomplished by ensuring that all decisions regarding affordable housing, equitable housing, tenant rights and homelessness are made with an equity lens and with the participation of low-income residents and those who are or have been homeless.

We would advocate for the creation of low-income and accessible housing throughout the city, including the construction of new mixed-use developments, especially in high-potential neighborhoods with easy access to transport, jobs and food.

Following: Brockton mayor Robert Sullivan wins pre-election in landslide, Cardoso advance

Ward 3 school committee

Jared Homer

Age: 41

Biography : I’m a Democrat who spent 19 years working in public schools, starting at Westwood High School as an administrative assistant for five years, then at Stoughton High School as a long-term back-up guidance counselor for a year, and finally as a guidance counselor at Taunton High School since 2008.

1. What do you think is the biggest problem facing Brockton Public Schools today?

The biggest problem facing students right now is directly related to going back to school this fall. Children whose parents or guardians may have lost their jobs have had problems. Others have struggled with the lack of one-on-one support, mental health counseling, nutritious foods, and the safety and comfort of the familiar structures of a school day.

While distance learning may be the best case scenario for severe interruptions

posed by the current pandemic, teachers and administrators across the state are still grappling with how to help students adjust to the limitations imposed

both in school and in lifelong online learning.

2. Do you agree with the state’s mask mandate for schools? Why or why not?

I think it is important that educators follow the advice of health professionals,

and therefore any warning regarding mask warrants that allow our children to

return to classrooms for in-person learning should be implemented.

Fortunately, Brockton Public Schools have been able to offer an additional online learning option. Having worked closely with students living with family members who are at critical risk of exposure to the COVID virus, I support the decision to allow families to continue their students with a distance learning option. Parents must continue to have options available to them to maintain health and safety in their homes.

3. It is well documented that children are late for school due to the COVID-19 pandemic. What would you do as a member of the school committee to make sure the Brockton students can catch up?

To meet the needs of our students and families, I would support all efforts to expand our school resources to help our community through measures such as after school tutoring, clubs, sports and activities, and through awareness programs to support literacy, mental health, and school culture.

In addition, I would support programs aimed specifically at supporting families who worked tirelessly to care for their children’s education at home during the pandemic. I would like to see opportunities for teacher training, socio-emotional support groups and community building.

Alain Green

1. What do you think is the biggest problem facing Brockton Public Schools today?

The biggest problem our schools face is improving our grades, not just a little, but a lot. If that means adding two more classes each school day, so be it.

2. Do you agree with the state’s mask mandate for schools? Why or why not?

I think masks should always be worn because the jury has still not determined the percentage of students in vaccination for “herd immunity”. masks protect other students from cough and sneeze droplets.

3. It is well documented that children are late for school due to the COVID-19 pandemic. What would you do as a member of the school committee to make sure the Brockton students can catch up?

Brockton students were already late before the COVID-19 pandemic. Boston Magazine ranked us 151 out of 152 in the state. If we continue as we are, we will be 152, and I want us to climb the rankings, not to go all the way down!

Enterprise Staff Writer Susannah Sudborough can be contacted by email at [email protected] You can follow her on Twitter at @k_sudborough. Support local journalism by purchasing a digital or print subscription to The Enterprise today.



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