Texas A&M Agrilife named in federal lawsuit: here’s why.

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Texas A&M Agrilife researcher has been named in a groundbreaking lawsuit filed by PETA against the National Institutes of Health (NIH), NIH Director Francis Collins, Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Secretary of the HHS Xavier Becerra.

The lawsuit alleges that the funding of animal sepsis experiments despite decades of failure, a waste of taxpayer money, and the NIH’s own recognition that mice are not good role models for humans, abuses the discretionary power of the agencies and violates their obligation to fund research to improve human health and minimize the number of animals used in experiments.

Texas A&M Agrilife received money from NIH to study sepsis and is now named in the recently filed sepsis research lawsuit.

“As long as the NIH continues to study sepsis in mice, the number of human deaths will continue to increase,” said Kathy Guillermo, senior vice president of PETA. “The PETA lawsuit challenges the agency’s bizarre allegiance to these ineffective and cruel experiments rather than to the health of the public it serves.”

Background:

In 2013, a study showed that sepsis does not affect humans like mice, and Francis Collins lamented the “loss of decades of research and billions of dollars” in the development of 150 drugs that have successfully treated the disease. sepsis in mice but failed in humans. At least 15 peer-reviewed publications over the past 18 years have described how sepsis in humans is fundamentally different from sepsis in other animals, according to the release.

Sepsis is the body’s extreme response to infection, affecting one in three patients who die in hospital and killing nearly 270,000 Americans in a typical year. Animal studies have not yielded effective treatments. A landmark 2013 study found that sepsis does not affect humans like mice, and Collins lamented the “waste of decades of research and billions of dollars” in developing 150 drugs that have successfully treated sepsis. in mice but failed in humans. At least 15 peer-reviewed publications over the past 18 years have described how sepsis in humans is fundamentally different from sepsis in other animals.

Despite this, the NIH still spends tens of millions of taxpayer dollars each year on sepsis experiments in which animals are injected with toxins or feces, are opened during invasive surgeries, force-fed harmful bacteria. and / or forced to inhale a bacterial “slime”. The animals suffer from fever, chills, diarrhea, difficulty breathing, lethargy, disorientation, shock, failure of several organs, and possibly death. PETA also wants the agencies to focus on funding sepsis research relevant to humans that can actually help afflicted humans. Examples include in vitro experiments using human cells, sophisticated analyzes of human genome data, mathematical and computer modeling of human biology, and experiments using donated human tissues.

Before taking legal action, PETA compiled a comprehensive scientific and legal report describing exactly why NIH’s funding for animal sepsis experiments is potentially illegal as well as scientifically ill-founded and sent it to NIH.

PETA has filed a lawsuit under the Federal Administrative Procedure Act, which allows a final agency action to be challenged as arbitrary or capricious, abuse of discretion, or otherwise not in accordance with the law.

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